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University of Silesia in Katowice

  • Polski
  • English
Faculty of Science and Technology
Logo European City of Science 2024

DISCIPLINE – CHEMISTRY
TYPE OF STUDY – LECTURES

We all know the phase transitions from our daily experiences of boiling water or watching an ice-cream melt on a hot day. The melting of a solid and the boiling of a liquid are so ordinary that we do not realize that we are dealing with a phenomenon of “first-order phase transitions”. However, thanks to this, we begin to understand that there are different phases of matter and that, under the right conditions, matter can change phase, in which its properties change in a distinct and easily visible way. In this brief introduction, we consider the similarities and dissimilarities between phase transitions, and in particular how they are identified despite their sometimes exotic and different nature. We will discuss qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of pressure and temperature changes in one-component systems. We will discuss the energy and volume effects accompanying phase changes. We will analyze the phase diagram of water, carbon dioxide, tin. We will find and explain phase transitions around us and related effects. We will answer the following questions: How does a pressure cooker work? Why do we feel cold when we get out of the shower? Why are we ice skating and why can we throw snowballs? How can you get decaffeinated coffee? How is “Smoke” made in horror movies? We will describe the eruption of a geyser and much more.

Aromatic compounds – history, characteristics, synthetic methods, properties; heteroaromatic and heterocyclic compounds – characteristics, synthetic procedures, properties.

Phenothiazine and quinoline derivatives – modern methods of preparation, characteristics and broad applications.

Within the lecture, the following topics will be presented:

  • possibilities of tuning of a geometric and electronic structure of a coordination compound via a proper choice of a metal ion and ligand/ligands;
  • possible electronic transitions occurring in a coordination compound upon its photoexcitation;
  • significance of an electronic structure of a coordination compound in a view of its potential applications (luminescent materials and chemotherapeutic agents).

The aim of the lecture is to familiarize students with the role that chemometrics has to play in modern chemistry, including the conducted experiment. 

In particular, we will focus on such aspects as:

  1. chemometrics – definition and scope of applications,
  2. sources of measurement data,
  3. types of measurement data and their organization,
  4. planning and optimization of the experiment,
  5. exploration of multidimensional physico-chemical data, enabling the identification of samples with similar physico-chemical properties, unique samples, variables with similar characteristics,
  6. the idea of quantitative and qualitative modeling of multidimensional physico-chemical data. 

The aim of the lecture is to introduce practical aspects of selected topics in thermodynamics of materials. The following issues will be discussed:

  1. Thermodynamic properties of bulk phases:
    a. heat capacity,
    b. thermal expansion coefficient,
    c. compressibility.
  2. Surface thermodynamics:
    a. interfacial and surface tension,
    b. solid-liquid interactions,
    c. colloids.

This short introductory course cover the general aspects of drug discovery and scientific methods in medicinal chemistry. Three drugs from different classes will be discussed along with the history of their discovery, mechanism of activity and relevant biochemical aspect of their use.

Antibacterial agents and antibiotics.

Sympatholytic drugs and beta-blockers.

Anti-histamine drugs.

We all know the phase transitions from our daily experiences of boiling water or watching an ice-cream melt on a hot day. The melting of a solid and the boiling of a liquid are so ordinary that we do not realize that we are dealing with a phenomenon of “first-order phase transitions”. However, thanks to this, we begin to understand that there are different phases of matter and that, under the right conditions, matter can change phase, in which its properties change in a distinct and easily visible way. In this brief introduction, we consider the similarities and dissimilarities between phase transitions, and in particular how they are identified despite their sometimes exotic and different nature. We will discuss qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of pressure and temperature changes in one-component systems. We will discuss the energy and volume effects accompanying phase changes. We will analyze the phase diagram of water, carbon dioxide, tin. We will find and explain phase transitions around us and related effects. We will answer the following questions: How does a pressure cooker work? Why do we feel cold when we get out of the shower? Why are we ice skating and why can we throw snowballs? How can you get decaffeinated coffee? How is “Smoke” made in horror movies? We will describe the eruption of a geyser and much more.

Aromatic compounds – history, characteristics, synthetic methods, properties; heteroaromatic and heterocyclic compounds – characteristics, synthetic procedures, properties.

Phenothiazine and quinoline derivatives – modern methods of preparation, characteristics and broad applications.

Within the lecture, the following topics will be presented:

  • possibilities of tuning of a geometric and electronic structure of a coordination compound via a proper choice of a metal ion and ligand/ligands;
  • possible electronic transitions occurring in a coordination compound upon its photoexcitation;
  • significance of an electronic structure of a coordination compound in a view of its potential applications (luminescent materials and chemotherapeutic agents).

As part of the lecture, students will learn the general concept of sample characterization through the so-called spectroscopic fingerprints and their use in the quality control process of selected products. The basic spectroscopic techniques that enable effective quality control of products will be discussed, in particular the classical technique of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and selected methods of hyperspectral imaging (Vis and NIR). We will also learn about process analytical technology (PAT). Moreover, we will also pay attention to the quantitative and qualitative aspects of quality control in terms of chemometrics. 

The aim of the lecture is to familiarize students with the role that chemometrics has to play in modern chemistry, including the conducted experiment. 

In particular, we will focus on such aspects as:

  1. chemometrics – definition and scope of applications,
  2. sources of measurement data,
  3. types of measurement data and their organization,
  4. planning and optimization of the experiment,
  5. exploration of multidimensional physico-chemical data, enabling the identification of samples with similar physico-chemical properties, unique samples, variables with similar characteristics,
  6. the idea of quantitative and qualitative modeling of multidimensional physico-chemical data. 

The aim of the lecture is to introduce practical aspects of selected topics in thermodynamics of materials. The following issues will be discussed:

  1. Thermodynamic properties of bulk phases:
    a. heat capacity,
    b. thermal expansion coefficient,
    c. compressibility.
  2. Surface thermodynamics:
    a. interfacial and surface tension,
    b. solid-liquid interactions,
    c. colloids.

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