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University of Silesia in Katowice

  • Polski
  • English
Faculty of Science and Technology
Logo European City of Science 2024

DISCIPLINE – PHYSICS
TYPE OF STUDY – LECTURES

In the first part of the lecture we well answer the following questions: What is medical physics? What do medical physicists in therapy and image diagnostics? Short description of chosen diagnostics and therapy techniques. What is the future of medical physics? The lecture involves experiments with use of chosen medical devices.

Afterwards, the lecture will present the latest trends in the study of potential anticancer drugs. The topic of stages of research on new drugs will be discussed, with emphasis on the problem of in vivo testing. Moreover, the basic methods of toxicity testing of new substances and methods of verification of the obtained results will be presented. In the next part, other more advanced techniques (such as Western Blot, flow cytometry, PCR) allowing to determine the mechanism of anticancer activity will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of the problems of selectivity of cytostatics to healthy tissue and methods to improve these parameters.

In the first part of the lecture the following will be discussed: the structure of the atomic nucleus (including the Rutherford experiment), nuclear decay (including natural radioactivity, i.e., the one around us), the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter (including their use for particle detection) and the basis of nuclear reactions. The lecture will end with a presentation of 2-3 selected contemporary experiments in particle physics.

Afterwards, the concept of lepton numbers and the theoretical basis of its introduction related to massive neutrinos will be discussed. The processes that break the lepton number will be considered in the context of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations and processes which take place both at low energies (e.g. neutrinoless double beta decay) and high energies (e.g. proton-proton collisions with Majorana neutrinos).

In the first part of the lecture, the following topics will be discussed:

    1. Introduction to physics of nanostructures and nanomaterials
      • Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials
      • A short history of nanotechnology and nanophysics
      • General classification of nanosystems
      • Application of nanomaterials in various industries
      • Examples of 1D (nanotubes and nanowires), 2D (thin films and coatings) and 3D (nanoparticles and nanocomposites) nanomaterials
    2. How to produce nanoobjects – selected synthesis methods
      • top-down and bottom-up approaches
      • several preparation methods of thin films and multilayer systems
      • optical lithography
    3. Selected examples of the quantitative description of nanomaterials
      • Determining the size distribution by dynamic laser light scattering
      • Analysis of crystallites size by X-ray diffraction
      • Determining the thickness of thin films by X-ray reflectivity
      • Using electron microscopy in the visualization of nanostructures

Afterwards, we will present the following topics:

  • Magnetic field, magnetic field vector B earth’s magnetic field, Gauss’s law of magnetic field, motion of electric charge in magnetic field, Lorentz force
  • The magnetic field around a current-carrying wire, conducting wire frame in a magnetic field, magnetic dipole moment
  • Magnetism on the atomic scale, orbital and spin magnetic moment, basic quantities (magnetic moment, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, magnetic field strength)
  • Types of magnetism (dia-, para-, ferro-, antiferro-, ferri-, heli-, meta-, mikto- spin glasses))
  • Methods used for testing magnetic materials
  • Examples for the application of magnetic materials.

Topics include the basics of the theory of electric circuits, simple semiconductor devices, the use of operational amplifiers in the analog processing technique.

The differences between the stable and metastable states and the amorphous phase will be presented during the lecture. In particular, the properties of supercooled liquids as a large group of metastable systems from which amorphous glasses are formed will be presented. The methods of achieving this state and selected methods of testing its properties (e.g., dielectric spectroscopy, rheology) will be presented. Unique methods of research on the influence of high pressure during isothermal compression and isobaric cooling of supercooled systems, used in IF, will be presented. Examples of practical use of amorphous materials (drugs) will be presented.

What is an experiment and what role does in physics? During the lecture, we will analyze simple experiments and together we will consider whether the explanation is always simple and obvious?

In the first part of the lecture, the following topics will be discussed:

    1. Introduction to physics of nanostructures and nanomaterials
      • Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials
      • A short history of nanotechnology and nanophysics
      • General classification of nanosystems
      • Application of nanomaterials in various industries
      • Examples of 1D (nanotubes and nanowires), 2D (thin films and coatings) and 3D (nanoparticles and nanocomposites) nanomaterials
    2. How to produce nanoobjects – selected synthesis methods
      • top-down and bottom-up approaches
      • several preparation methods of thin films and multilayer systems
      • optical lithography
    3. Selected examples of the quantitative description of nanomaterials
      • Determining the size distribution by dynamic laser light scattering
      • Analysis of crystallites size by X-ray diffraction
      • Determining the thickness of thin films by X-ray reflectivity
      • Using electron microscopy in the visualization of nanostructures

Afterwards, we will present the following topics:

  • Magnetic field, magnetic field vector B earth’s magnetic field, Gauss’s law of magnetic field, motion of electric charge in magnetic field, Lorentz force
  • The magnetic field around a current-carrying wire, conducting wire frame in a magnetic field, magnetic dipole moment
  • Magnetism on the atomic scale, orbital and spin magnetic moment, basic quantities (magnetic moment, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, magnetic field strength)
  • Types of magnetism (dia-, para-, ferro-, antiferro-, ferri-, heli-, meta-, mikto- spin glasses))
  • Methods used for testing magnetic materials
  • Examples for the application of magnetic materials.

Topics include the basics of the theory of electric circuits, simple semiconductor devices, the use of operational amplifiers in the analog processing technique.
Afterwards, the lecture will be a journey into the numerical modeling and description of physical phenomena. First, we will present the history of computer simulations and the need for introducing simulations as a tool to overcome the limitations of analytical description of phenomena. Then, we will show that computer simulations offer great opportunities for modeling physics phenomena, from classical physics to advanced phenomena of solid-state physics and materials engineering. Finally, we will present several example simulations along with a discussion of the results, how to verify them and traps associated with numerical modeling.

In the first part of the lecture we well answer the following questions: What is medical physics? What do medical physicists in therapy and image diagnostics? Short description of chosen diagnostics and therapy techniques. What is the future of medical physics? The lecture involves experiments with use of chosen medical devices.

Afterwards, the lecture will present the latest trends in the study of potential anticancer drugs. The topic of stages of research on new drugs will be discussed, with emphasis on the problem of in vivo testing. Moreover, the basic methods of toxicity testing of new substances and methods of verification of the obtained results will be presented. In the next part, other more advanced techniques (such as Western Blot, flow cytometry, PCR) allowing to determine the mechanism of anticancer activity will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of the problems of selectivity of cytostatics to healthy tissue and methods to improve these parameters.

In the first part of the lecture the following will be discussed: the structure of the atomic nucleus (including the Rutherford experiment), nuclear decay (including natural radioactivity, i.e., the one around us), the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter (including their use for particle detection) and the basis of nuclear reactions. The lecture will end with a presentation of 2-3 selected contemporary experiments in particle physics.

Afterwards, the concept of lepton numbers and the theoretical basis of its introduction related to massive neutrinos will be discussed. The processes that break the lepton number will be considered in the context of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations and processes which take place both at low energies (e.g. neutrinoless double beta decay) and high energies (e.g. proton-proton collisions with Majorana neutrinos).

What is an experiment and what role does in physics? During the lecture, we will analyze simple experiments and together we will consider whether the explanation is always simple and obvious?

The differences between the stable and metastable states and the amorphous phase will be presented during the lecture. In particular, the properties of supercooled liquids as a large group of metastable systems from which amorphous glasses are formed will be presented. The methods of achieving this state and selected methods of testing its properties (e.g., dielectric spectroscopy, rheology) will be presented. Unique methods of research on the influence of high pressure during isothermal compression and isobaric cooling of supercooled systems, used in IF, will be presented. Examples of practical use of amorphous materials (drugs) will be presented.

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